Home > Novel, Philadelphia Writers' Conference > PWC 2015 Notes on The Novel – Plot with Solomon Jones and Gregg Frost

PWC 2015 Notes on The Novel – Plot with Solomon Jones and Gregg Frost

Writing the Novel – Plot – Solomon Jones http://www.solomonjones.com/
Setting determines what can happen in a story, what the rules are, the parameters. You have to establish it first. That’s Solomon’s rule. Of course, he went on to say, there are no rules.
“The memory ebbed and flowed like a river. Sometimes it was crystal clear, other times it was murky, but no matter how Tim Green’s recollection of that night ended up, it always started the same—at Kensington and Allegheny.” Excerpt from the prologue of “The Dead Man’s Wife,” by Solomon Jones.
But setting changes. Philly has changed since he wrote that prologue.
Audience member: It has to make you feel like you are there.
Time and Place. Mood.
The setting provides the first inkling of what the story is about. Make it authentic. Establish the norm.
Six steps:
1.- establish the setting
2.- who is the main character? Who has decisions to make.
3.- supporting characters. They are tools. They illuminates the main character
4.- establish the relationships between the characters.
5.- leads to conflict.
6.- resolution. How does the main character solve the problems posed above.
If you are writing about, say, 1985, think of technology and culture on the year you are writing about. What was the music, the style of dress, iPods (no), Walkmans? Etc. The same applies to writing in the present.
Gregg Frost substituted for the Saturday session http://www.gregoryfrost.com/
Today: Elements of Character.
All the elements should blend in seamlessly.
Raymond Chandler cut every page in three, to make sure there was some sensory reference in every page, even in every third of a page.
The novel setting must be concrete from page one.
Setting must match or reflect the character. We are products of the landscape, hence expressions of the world we come from.
In the fantasy world you build, you can boil down the world with one question: where does the coffee come from? Gregg said you may read about a 25th C meeting on some planet on some solar system on some galaxy where the characters get together for a cup of coffee. Where did they get it? Where did the coffee come from? The writer has to know the economy, the politics, the everything about the world. It is the same for the world of 1985, even if you never mention it.
Yesterday’s homework was to expand the 1985 scenario for University City. (Year and place were suggested by the audience)
When you know the setting, the period and the place suggests story but, you are restricted by setting etc., but those restrictions help form the story, bring it into sharper focus.
A short story, with very few exceptions, starts with the main character. Short stories are reductive, they close down as you approach the end. Novels are expansive, you can explore almost everything about your character.
The beginning of a novel is often the last thing written. In Solomon’s case, he wrote a prologue last, as a way to bring us to the main character, his defense attorney.
For interesting characters, put them in hell. Heaven is when all the stories are over.
Cluster writing (or free writing) is writing down a whole bunch of things about something, ie., all the technology available in 1985. Let it flow, as fast as you can. For characters, write what your character dreams about. You write and write to get to your character.
An example is writing and writing till something catches fire, say an alcoholic woman. At that point the writer starts to follow her, see what her day is like, and eventually discovers that after work and shopping she gets home having bought no food, so she ends up going out to a bar with her boyfriend and drinking. That becomes the cycle. That’s her day, her routine. You now know your character a bit better.
In “The art of dramatic writing,” by Lajos Egri, he speaks of the Physical, social and psychological.
Physiology: sex, age, height, weight, skin, hair, eyes, posture, appearance, health, other.
Sociology: class, occupation, education, home life, IQ, religion, community, politics,
Psychology: frustrations,, sex life, morality, ambition, temperament, attitude, complexes, superstitions, imagination.
The rest of the class consisted of (a) assuming we are writing a ghost story and (b) building a character by filling the requirements listed above.
In general, Gregg free writes fifty or sixty pages to see of if his idea has legs. Then he writes an outline. He thinks its crazy not to do so but he named other authors who never write an outline and those who start with one. [If you recall the blog on Book Architecture, Horwitz suggested that you write the outline between drafts one and two. Considering that Horwitz’s draft one is close to free writing, his approach and Gregg’s are similar. Up to this point, anyhow]
Session 3 [Back with Solomon] Much of the workshop session delved into Solomon’s six key steps.
1.- Setting
2.- Main Character. Character is what you do when no one is looking.
3.- Supporting Character
4.- Relationship
5.- Conflict
6.- Resolution

Advertisements
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: